Michele Clark wields the hula hoop for the crowd.
Michele Clark wields the hula hoop for the crowd. John Gass

Ukitopia making a name

ANIMALS and a large tea pot were some of the main attractions for the Ukitopia opening ceremony on Saturday night.

To top off winning this year's Australia Day Arts and Culture Award, the festival had enough financial support to put on an amazing show, festival director Natascha Wernick said.

“This year we got Festival Australia funding as well as funding from Tweed, so we were able to hold six weeks of workshops to make the animal costumes,” Ms Wernick said.

“We also had the installation of the large teapot which people put their wishes on teabags and we put them on the tea pot – their wishes were sung out as part of the opening ceremony.”

The third annual Ukitopia festival wrapped up yesterday afternoon after three days of music, workshops, market stalls and community celebration.

“This event is developing, and I think the community is beginning to understand what it is about, where for the first two years people weren't sure,” Ms Wernick said.

“The animals led everyone around to the gallery to see the Images of Uki,” vice president Tamara Woodward said.



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