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Vege Shed supports region's farmers

Emily Cotelli and Donna Flanagan in the 'Vege Shed' at Murwillumbah.
Emily Cotelli and Donna Flanagan in the 'Vege Shed' at Murwillumbah. Blainey Woodham

THE Vege Shed offers residents and visitors fruit and vegetables of unrivalled quality, according to owners Steve and Donna Flanagan.

The Tweed Valley Wy produce store is in its sixth year of operation and continues to support local farmers by sourcing 95% of its produce from local suppliers.

Mr Flanagan said the shed also employed four local sales girls who always greeted customers with a smile and offered great service.

The shop catered to the 'discerning customer' looking for high quality produce grown locally without spray.

"Although most of our produce is grown without sprays, we can't call it organic because some of the producers aren't actually certified," Mr Flanagan said.

Mr Flanagan's family has farmed in the Tweed for three generations and although the family farm is now located near Gratton, Mr Flanagan continues to buy from local farmers.

The shop was an important outlet for quality produce in the area and made a real difference to local producers, Mr Flanagan said.

We offer the best produce available at any moment and anything that doesn't grow in the area we source from South-east Queensland.

Because parking in Murwillumbah's town centre was at a premium, the shop provided easy access for motorists and families alike.

"Many families come and have some home-made ice cream next to the river," Mr Flanagan said.

Over the last few years the shop has attracted the custom of quite a few VIPs,  with rugby league star the late Arthur Beetson, Australian rugby union legend Chiller Wilson and former Australian cricket player Greg Richie, visiting the store to buy some organic produce.

"They come in, have a chat and sign my hat," Mr Flanagan said.

The Vege Shed is located at 51 Tweed Valley Way, next to the Ampol service station.

The store is open week days from 6.00am until 6.00pm, Saturdays from 6.00am until 3.30pm and Sundays from 7.00am until 2.30pm.

Topics:  business farmers fruit and veg murwillumbah organic produce



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