Margot Anthony and Randy Edwards from Tyalgum celebrate the release of the Tyalgum Music Festival 2016 program.
Margot Anthony and Randy Edwards from Tyalgum celebrate the release of the Tyalgum Music Festival 2016 program. Scott Powick

Village shines for its silver anniversary

A SMALL Tweed village will come alive with music and community events when the Tyalgum Music Festival celebrates is quarter century in September.

Festival patron Margot Anthony has been involved with the event since its inception.

Mrs Anthony, a pianist, embraced the longevity of the festival, which was initially known as the Tyalgum Festival of Classical Music but has since rebranded and diversified.

She looked forward to seeing what the event had in store for its 25th year.

"It's a very, very special year," Mrs Anthony said.

A team of local residents passionate about music, alongside violinist couple John and Carmel Willison, were crucial to the festival's success in its early days.

"It's amazing a little village like Tyalgum, known for it's Diggers' sports... could become the home of a classical festival," she said.

Mrs Anthony said a shift away from a purely classical program would help to secure the festival's future.

"There's not just purely classical music," she said.

 

BIG MILESTONE: Tyalgum Music Festival patron Margot Anthony looks forward to this year’s event.
BIG MILESTONE: Tyalgum Music Festival patron Margot Anthony looks forward to this year’s event. Scott Powick

"Last year we had a big event in the street. This year we have Buddhist monks, which is an amazing addition. It's tempered now with non-classical events."

She said the changes would help to make the event appeal to an even wider audience.

"It's broadening the net and it's still very strongly supported by people across the Tweed and everywhere in Australia," she said.

Co-artistic director Anna McMichael said she was delighted with the program, released this week.

"We're hoping to attract a bigger audience with all the community street events," Ms McMichael said.

"There's a lot to see this year apart from coming to the concerts themselves."

 

Randy Edwards from Tyalgum celebrate the release of the Tyalgum Music Festival 2016 program.
Randy Edwards from Tyalgum celebrate the release of the Tyalgum Music Festival 2016 program. Scott Powick

She said the village's markets would also fall on the Saturday of the event.

Ms McMichael said tenor singer Andrew Goodwin would be among the weekend's highlights.

"He's a very beautiful singer, he's one of Australia's best tenors," she said.

"Ironwood was really popular last year and they're coming back and bringing a very special (forte) piano all the way from Sydney.

"It's the piano Mozart wrote for."

She said the diverse program was the perfect fit for the festival's milestone.

"I think it's really quite a celebration of all sorts of music," she said.

"It sort of captures the spirit of Tyalgum and the history of Tyalgum."



Ella, the doyenne of Uki

Ella, the doyenne of Uki

TALKING HISTORY with Tweed Regional Museum

Man killed by lightning in NSW

Man killed by lightning in NSW

Severe storm activity is heading for the state this afternoon

Royal Navy musos are back on deck

Royal Navy musos are back on deck

Can't stop the beat at Currumbin RSL

Local Partners