Salt water has been found in the Tweed water supply.
Salt water has been found in the Tweed water supply. TongRo Images Inc

Voluntary outdoor water restrictions lifted

UPDATE 3.45pm: TWO dredges are being used to pump salty water from the lower depths of the Bray Park Weir, as works continue to fix the Tweed's water supply.

Dredging is being done from depths up to 12 metres, resulting about 380 litres a second being pumped and discarged over the weir wall.

Council's water and wastewater manager Anthony Burnham works will continue to harvest water from the weir up to about two metres deep and refresh it with a continual release of 50 megalitres a day from Clarrie Hall Dam.

"We are continuing to get good quality water into the Bray Park Water Treatment Plant but it will still be several days before the salty water has been removed through household taps with normal water consumption,” Mr Burnham said.

Dredging of the lower depths of the weir will continue for the remainder of the week.

EARLIER: A WEEK of voluntary outdoor water restrictions have been lifted, as council's continues to work on reducing salt levels in the water supply at Bray Park Weir.

More residents are now dealing with salty water, after a high tide on Monday, August 21 saw salt water overlap the weir and contaminated the drinking supply.

While the current water supply is safe to drink, council's water and wastewater manager Anthony Burnham said on-going works at the weir, including dredging and water managment, has resulted in a lower salt contents found in the town water supply over the weekend.

"Dredging is ongoing and we are continuing to release water from Clarrie Hall Dam,” Mr Burnham said.

"We expect water quality in the weir will continue to improve during the next three to five days.”

The improved water quality has assisted Council to refill reservoirs throughout Tweed Shire. However, the ongoing presence of elevated salt levels means this salty taste is now affecting more consumers than last week.

Mr Burnham thanked the community for minimising water use while Council worked to bring salt levels down.

"The community response bought us time to drain the worst affected parts of the system before demand for water forced us to release water with higher than normal salt levels into the system,” he said.

"Ninety megalitres of water has been released from Clarrie Hall Dam each day to top up the good supplies, while dredging works drew the heavier salty water from the depths of the weir pool and discharged it back downstream.

"Salt levels again marginally improved at Bray Park Weir during the weekend as a result.”

Council has confirmed the water supply is suitable for outdoor use, such as washing cars but some care should be taken when watering salt-intolerant plants or for use in freshwater fish tanks.

The Uki and Tyalgum villages have a separate water treatment system and are not affected.



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