Warning to Uber users this New Year's

AFTER unsuspecting customers across the country got the shock of their lives using the Uber ridesharing service last New Year's Eve, the company has got in early with price-surge warnings for this year.

While the service is well known for its low pricing, peak times such as New Year's now come with a clear caveat for consumers to check the estimated fare before ordering a ride.

Uber Queensland General Manager Sam Bool said he anticipated hundreds of uberX driver-partners would be working to get locals home from parties and fireworks as tonight's celebrations came to a close.

But in fair warning, the company issued a statement informing users there would be an algorithm-based fare increase that upped the prices based on driver availability and customer requirements.

"During times of peak demand -- on NYE that's between midnight and 3am - fares increase (via an algorithm) to help ensure a driver is always nearby and you can get a ride if you need one," the statement said.

"Before you request an Uber, you'll see the estimated cost of the ride.

"When fares are higher than usual, you'll be notified and asked to confirm the rate in app.

"If it's out of your price range, you can always check back later."

The company is also urging users to download the latest version of the app, which automatically offers upfront fare estimates and offers new features, but assured users of the old version they would be suitably alerted to the price change and would have to accept the estimated fare before they could call a driver.

Other New Year's tips offered by the company included double checking your driver's car make and model as well as their name so you can double check you're getting in the right car.

People can also split their fare with friends within the app.

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