Byron Bay mother Mellanie Coppin with the treehouse outside her home. A lease for the use of the road reserve area will go back before Byron Shire Council soon.
Byron Bay mother Mellanie Coppin with the treehouse outside her home. A lease for the use of the road reserve area will go back before Byron Shire Council soon.

What it takes to keep this much-loved treehouse legal

A TREEHOUSE may sound like a simple thing, but a Byron Bay woman has been going to great lengths to keep one outside her home.

After Byron Shire Council recieved a complaint about the treehouse, which sits between two trees on a road reserve, they voted in April, 2018 to grant Mellanie Coppin a lease of the land to keep it.

The cost of a 12-month lease was the grand sum of $1, but Ms Coppin was also required to secure public liability insurance, an engineering certificate "attesting to the structural integrity of the structure" and an arborist report confirming the health of the trees.

She has so far successfully renewed the lease each year, and the matter will return to the council at the September 24 ordinary meeting.

 

The treehouse outside Mellanie Coppin's Byron Bay home. A lease for the use of the road reserve area will go back before Byron Shire Council soon.
The treehouse outside Mellanie Coppin's Byron Bay home. A lease for the use of the road reserve area will go back before Byron Shire Council soon.

 

Ms Coppin said she was thankful the council had been willing to settle on a solution.

"It's really nice that they had that kind of understanding of it," she said.

She was "a bit miffed" when the treehouse originally attracted a complaint about six months after being built, but felt it had been "a thing of beauty" enjoyed by most.

"I know it didn't get instigated the right way," she said.

"It hasn't caused a car crash; it's not that big a showstopper."

With passers-by often stopping to take photos and comment on the structure, Ms Coppin believes it "satisfies all sorts of things" the council wants to see happen in the shire, like celebrating creativity and community connection.

Ms Coppin, who has a 10-year-old child, said she was happy to have checks undertaken each year to ensure the treehouse is "robust".

"It's worth it because I love looking out there and seeing it," she said.

The council received one submission on the pending lease renewal, from another resident who was supportive of the treehouse's retention.

In a report that will go before Thursday's meeting, the council's staff have recommended the lease be renewed for another year.

This year, they have recommended the arborist and engineer reports obtained by Ms Coppin should be valid until September 30, 2022.



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