LEND A HAND: Jan Pilgrim with a possum being cared for by the Tweed Valley Wildlife Carers group, which has issued a call for more volunteers.
LEND A HAND: Jan Pilgrim with a possum being cared for by the Tweed Valley Wildlife Carers group, which has issued a call for more volunteers. Scott Davis

Wildlife group on the hunt for help

WITH issues ranging from injured wallabies to a bat in the bathroom, numerous Tweed residents have called on the volunteers at Tweed Valley Wildlife Carers to assist our native fauna.

But right now, it's the group that is in need of assistance and they have issued an urgent plea for more volunteers.

TVWC president Jan Pilgrim said the group, which has been helping rehabilitate injured animals for the past three decades, is particularly keen to attract new helpers to fill the supporting roles which underpin the organisation.

"We've got about 75 members at the moment but most people are what we call social members,” Ms Pilgrim said.

"We're always looking for more volunteers because there's always more work to do.

"We cover the Tweed Shire, so about 13000 square kilometres and there are 212 species of wildlife that are endangered here.”

Ms Pilgrim said among the services offered by the group is a 24-hour wildlife hotline while there are specially trained carers to help with injured animals.

"It's highly specific and you must have training and at the moment we have more of a need for support people,” she said.

Ms Pilgrim said many animals across the Tweed had been injured or displaced during the March floods, while many of the group's volunteers had also watched their own homes flood.

"We've just had a very hard year this year,” she said.

"There were a lot of animals affected by the flooding but we've just had to keep going even when we were flood-affected ourselves. We couldn't stop because the animals needed us.”

Ms Pilgrim said the region's growing population, and subsequent reduction of wildlife habitat had triggered a rise in the number of animals that require rescuing and nursing back to a healthy state for re-release.

Ms Pilgrim said those considering volunteering for TVWC would find it highly rewarding.

"It's so satisfying,” she said.

"To nurse an animal back to health, it's an incredible feeling.”

An orientation day for new volunteers will be held on Sunday, November 19.

Visit tvwc.org.au or phone the hotline on 0266724789 to report a sick or injured animal, help out or donate to the group.



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